Our History

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The Beginning.

Florida Keys

Florida Keys

My first memory of the Florida Keys was a Boy Scout trip to Camp Sawyer on Summerland Key, probably around 1968. A few of us (Fox Patrol) headed down the Friday before the rest of the troops joined us on Saturday. We stopped on the way down at a small wooden smoke-shack for smoked fish, took our pick of location at the campsite, and witnessed the amazing sun set itself into the Gulf of Mexico. The following morning, standing on the bridge , I saw the same sun rise from the Atlantic. In the water below, a Manta Ray with a 15 foot wingspan breached the water, a school of Tarpon rolled past, and a group of bottlenosed dolphins sped between the pilings. At 11 years old, I was hooked.

The following years took me down to the Keys from Miami as often as I could manage to get away. Slowly, they were transformed into the destination they have become today. The old Overseas Highway, built on top of Henry Flagler’s Overseas Railroad was slowly replaced with a new system of bridges. Safer, faster and wider, the intimidation factor of the old highway was gone, and the traffic started flowing down the chain. Many who drove down decided not to make the return trip, and the population and building has not ceased. Almost all of the spots where we would spend the weekend fishing and sleeping outdoors are now inaccessible. The wooden smokehouse is long gone, and much of the impressions made back then are simply memories. But there are some things that will never change. Sunset in the Florida Keys will always be spectacular. The purple sky around Islamorada will stay the same. The smell of the mangroves and saltwater, thunderheads working their way East, filling the air with electricity, regardless of how much they build, these things will never change. I’ll always be able to go back to what has always been special about the Florida Keys, unless the Ice Caps melt.

Keys Vista

Keys Vista

My pie-making began more than 30 years ago, when I started making key lime pies at my home for family and friends. Basically, I was too disappointed with what was brought to me in a restaurant when ordering a slice. Back then it seemed as if ease-of-use and convenience had taken priority over culinary integrity. Most -if not all- the commercial bakeries were opting for some other method of making key lime pies other than using fresh squeezed key lime juice, and I believe the same is true today. Knowing where to get a handful of key limes anytime I needed them, I found it much more rewarding to make them myself. “If you want something done right, do it yourself”. It wouldn’t be until years later that I began making pies for a living.

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